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  1 The Rise and Fall of Charles Lindbergh
Author: Fleming, Candace Biographee: Lindbergh, Charles A.
 
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Class: Biography
Age: 12-19
Language: English
Demand: Hot
LC: TL540.L5
Grade: 7-12

Print Run: 15000
ISBN-13: 9780525646549
LCCN: 2019014659
Imprint: Schwartz & Wade
Publisher: Random House
Pub Date: 02/11/2020
Availability: Available
List: $18.99
  Hardcover
Physical Description: 372 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm H 9.5", W 6.5", D 1.3", 1.4125 lbs.
LC Series:
Brodart Sources: Brodart's For Youth Interest Titles
Brodart's Insight Catalog: Teen
Brodart's TOP Young Adult Titles
Bibliographies:
Awards: BCCB Blue Ribbons
BCCB Starred Reviews
Booklist Editors Choice
Booklist Starred Reviews
Horn Book Guide Titles, Rated 1 - 4
Horn Book Starred Reviews
Kirkus Best Books
Kirkus Starred Reviews
Publishers Weekly Annual Best Books Selections
Publishers Weekly Starred Reviews
School Library Journal Best Books
School Library Journal Starred Reviews
YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults
Starred Reviews: Booklist
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
Horn Book
Kirkus Reviews
Publishers Weekly
School Library Journal
TIPS Subjects: Aviation/Aeronautics
History, American (General)
Biography, Individual
BISAC Subjects: YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / Science & Technology
YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / History / United States / General
YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / Transportation / Aviation
LC Subjects: Aeronautics, Records
Aeronautics, Records, Juvenile literature
Air pilots
Air pilots, United States, Biography, Juvenile literature
Lindbergh, Charles A., (Charles Augustus),, 1902-1974
Lindbergh, Charles A., (Charles Augustus),, 1902-1974, Juvenile literature
SEARS Subjects: Air pilots, United States, Biography
Lindbergh, Charles A., (Charles Augustus),, 1902-1974
Reading Programs: Lexile Level: 980
 
Annotations
Brodart's TOP Young Adult Titles | 02/01/2020
Publisher Annotation: From a true master of YA nonfiction, author of the acclaimed THE FAMILY ROMANOV, discover the dark side of Charles Lindbergh in a riveting biography of one of America's most celebrated heroes, and most complicated, troubled men. 384pp.
Starred Reviews:
Booklist | 01/01/2020
Grades 9-12. Though Charles Lindbergh achieved fame and adoration as an accomplished American aviator, he was an overwhelmingly complicated figure. In an eminently readable, at times thrilling, and occasionally deeply disturbing biography, the widely acclaimed Fleming (Amelia Lost, 2011) returns to the skies. In the book's first section, she tracks Lindbergh's meteoric rise to American hero, from his solo flight from New York to Paris to his marriage to Anne Morrow and the kidnapping and subsequent death of their child. In the second half, she maps the fall: Lindbergh's growing disgust with the American press and his anti-Semitism led to an increased admiration of Hitler, and public opinion shifted as he advocated for isolationism and white nationalism. Throughout runs a common thread: as he crossed the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis, as he searched for his missing son, as he argued for eugenics and the environment in turn, Lindbergh was a man obsessed with ending death. Fleming, who takes care to shine the spotlight on Anne as an individual, states that she wanted Charles and Anne to speak for themselves; included dialogue propels the narrative and was taken directly from their journals and letters. Fleming places, in his historical context and ours, a man of intense contradictions. Absorbing and distressing in turns, this utterly prescient capture of a life--and the lives it influenced--is essential in classrooms and for history buffs alike. Maggie Reagan. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2020.
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books | 01/01/2020
R. Gr. 7-12. The shining, sympathetic legend of Charles Lindbergh has a tenacious grip in public imagination: the handsome boy-next-door aviator whose 1927 New York to Paris solo flight established the United States as an aeronautic force to be reckoned with; the grieving father whose toddler son was kidnapped from his bed and later found dead. These threads continue to dominate the Lindbergh saga, but contemporaries witnessed a darker side as well, as the all-American hero openly sympathized with Nazism, became something of an unwitting dupe in a German disinformation campaign, and rallied a rabid fan base of America First isolationists drawn as much from white supremacy as pacifist movements. In this smoothly written, even-handed biography, Fleming deftly conveys how Lindbergh's interest in aviation overlapped with an interest in medical technology and efforts to extend life through organ life support, which in turn connected him with eugenicist Alexis Carrel. Under Carrel's influence, Lindbergh's own philosophy of human perfectibility burgeoned, and it wasn't much of a leap for him to articulate hope for a future in which superior Aryan whites (like himself) would exceed current life spans and rule the masses in a political system based on scientific reason (like Hitler's Germany purported to be). While never justifying Lindbergh's fascist leanings, Fleming contextualizes his rise and fall from public grace within a zeitgeist of technological promise, expanding media frenzy, economic depression, and global political upheaval that enabled a celebrity to become spokesperson for fringe causes. An extensive bibliography and source notes are included, as well as a section of period photographs. EB. 384p. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE UNIV. OF ILLINOIS, c2020.
Horn Book | 01/01/2020
Middle School, High School. Stitching together important life events, insightful anecdotes, and primary sources, Fleming (Amelia Lost, rev. 3/11; The Family Romanov, rev. 7/14) creates a cohesive and comprehensive biography of a charismatic, flawed figure. Charles Lindbergh made history with his 1927 solo transatlantic flight from New York City to Paris, and the resulting fame kept him in the public eye for the rest of his life. Notoriously, Lindbergh and his wife were victims of the "Crime of the Century," when their infant son was kidnapped and murdered. Fleming examines the forces that shaped Lindbergh, from his early childhood to his extraordinary work ethic to his keen appreciation of all things scientific and mechanical. But there was a dark side to Lindbergh, too. From an early age he considered himself a "superior specimen," physically and genetically; chose friends out of expediency; lived a life ruled by exacting checklists. His marriage was marred by sexism, misogyny, narcissism, and adultery, while his political views were even worse: a Nazi sympathizer, he unapologetically espoused racism, xenophobia, and white supremacy. Fleming employs a deft hand here: she doesn't draw contemporary parallels, but they will be easy enough for young readers to see (especially in the prologue, which describes a 1941 America First rally virtually indistinguishable from a Trump rally). It's not easy to write the biography of a person who elicits, by turns, admiration, sympathy, and revulsion, but Fleming has accomplished this juggling act, and in doing so, she has created a historical narrative that couldn't feel more contemporary. A bibliography, source notes, and an index are appended; a twenty-four-page section of black-and-white photographs is inserted in the center. Jonathan Hunt January/February 2020 p.103. 364pg. THE HORN BOOK, c2020.
Kirkus Reviews | 12/01/2019
The story of a flawed, complicated man. The son of a distant Minnesota congressman and a demanding, well-educated mother, young Charles Lindbergh grew up shuttling among the family farm, his grandfather's Detroit home, and Washington, D.C. Intelligent but uninterested in school, he began flying at age 19, getting involved in barnstorming and becoming an Air Service Reserve Corps officer. He used a combination of mechanical aptitude and moxie to successfully cross the Atlantic in a 1927 solo nonstop flight and was instantly propelled into worldwide celebrity. Success came at tremendous cost, however, when his infant son was kidnapped and murdered. Lindbergh was also his own enemy: His infatuation with eugenics led him into overt racism, open admiration for Hitler, and public denunciation of Jews. Fallen from grace, he nonetheless flew 50 clandestine combat missions in the South Pacific. He became an advocate for animal conservation but also had three secret families in addition to his acknowledged one. Fleming (Eleanor Roosevelt's in My Garage!, 2018, etc.) expertly sources and clearly details a comprehensive picture of a well-known, controversial man. Her frequent use of diaries allows much of the story to come through in Charles' and his wife Anne's own words. The man who emerges is hateable, pitiable, and admirable all at the same time, and this volume measures up to the best Lindbergh biographies for any audience. A remarkable biography. (bibliography, source notes, picture credits, index) (Biography. 12-adult). 384pg. KIRKUS MEDIA LLC, c2019.
Publishers Weekly | 12/23/2019
Ages 12-up. Fleming (Strongheart) skillfully crafts a layered portrait of a controversial figure: Charles Lindbergh. Well-paced sections covering Lindbergh's soaring popularity and plunging fall are divided into engaging segments. Passages about his early childhood establish his close relationship with his mother and the roots of his loner personality. In riveting detail and frequently quoting from Lindbergh's diaries and his wife's, Fleming relates his planning and execution of the solo transatlantic flight that made him the most famous man in the world, his marriage and the tragic kidnapping of his firstborn child, his obsession with engineering humankind's immortality, and the existence of his multiple secret families. Fleming finely hones the stark contrast between Lindbergh's rise and his fall from grace after he became fascinated with eugenics, sympathized with Hitler and the Nazis, and involved himself in America-first isolationist politics. A compelling biography of a flawed, larger-than-life man. (Feb.). 384p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2019.
School Library Journal | 01/01/2020
Gr 7 Up. Build a wall. America First. Foreign invaders. While these phrases echo standard Trump rally talking points, they were first uttered by Charles Lindbergh. Fleming digs into her subject's complicated life to uncover his true character. Following the birth of aviation, the skies were dangerous and unruly. Anyone who wanted to fly could. Lindbergh heartily accepted the challenge: as a showman, an army pilot, an airmail pilot, and finally as the first man to fly nonstop from New York to Paris. His unprecedented feat turned him into an overnight sensation and also marked the beginning of his antipathy toward the press. Unfortunately, his fame brought tragedy when his first child was kidnapped and murdered. What followed was the original "trial of the century." Fleming's moment-by-moment narration of Lindbergh's flight and the loss of his child evokes excitement and grief. But there is more to his story. Lindbergh was the creator of an artificial heart, an early environmentalist, an advocate of eugenics, a Nazi sympathizer, and a leader of the America First Committee. He derided a free press and blamed American Jewish people for leading the country into war. He glorified fascism while claiming to be a patriot. This biography, told in short, easy-to-read chapters, at times reads like a suspense novel. Fleming successfully deconstructs the public persona of Lindbergh and highlights how some of the aviator's core values (nationalism, xenophobia) echo the country's current political and social unrest. VERDICT A must-read. Drawing on primary sources, including Lindbergh's own journal, Fleming has crafted a cautionary tale of the downfalls of hero worship. Cathy DeCampli, Haddonfield Public Library, NJ. 384p. SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2020.
Journal Reviews
Horn Book Guide | 04/01/2020
1. YA. Stitching together important life events, insightful anecdotes, and primary sources, Fleming (Amelia Lost, rev. 3/11; The Family Romanov, rev. 7/14) creates a cohesive and comprehensive biography of a charismatic, flawed figure. Charles Lindbergh made history with his 1927 solo transatlantic flight from New York City to Paris, and the resulting fame kept him in the public eye for the rest of his life. Notoriously, Lindbergh and his wife were victims of the Crime of the Century when their infant son was kidnapped and murdered. Fleming examines the forces that shaped Lindbergh, from his early childhood to his extraordinary work ethic to his keen appreciation of all things scientific and mechanical. But there was a dark side to Lindbergh, too. From an early age he considered himself a superior specimen, physically and genetically; chose friends out of expediency; lived a life ruled by exacting checklists. His marriage was marred by sexism, misogyny, narcissism, and adultery, while his political views were even worse: a Nazi sympathizer, he unapologetically espoused racism, xenophobia, and white supremacy. Fleming employs a deft hand here: she doesn't draw contemporary parallels, but they will be easy enough for young readers to see (especially in the prologue, which describes a 1941 America First rally virtually indistinguishable from a Trump rally). It's not easy to write the biography of a person who elicits, by turns, admiration, sympathy, and revulsion, but Fleming has accomplished this juggling act, and in doing so, she has created a historical narrative that couldn't feel more contemporary. A bibliography, source notes, and an index are appended; a twenty-four-page section of black-and-white photographs is inserted in the center. jh. 364 pg. THE HORN BOOK, c2020.
9780525646549,dl.it[0].title